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New Electric Vehicle Initiatives at DTNA

by Dr. Andreas Juretzka, e-Mobility Group Lead6/8/2018
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Technology moves fast, and this new era of e-mobility is no exception, demanding massive investments in focused knowledge, support and infrastructure. At Daimler Trucks North America, we’ve always been comfortable out front, introducing innovative new trucking technology, as exemplified by two new electric Freightliner trucks: the eCascadia and eM2 106.

New Freightliner eCascadia and Freightliner eM2 106 Electric Trucks

As part of the widest range of commercial electric vehicles offered by any North American OEM, the all-new, all-electric Freightliner eCascadia and eM2 106 trucks are designed for specific applications and created with input from customers who rely on both diesel models.

According to DTNA CEO Roger Nielsen,

“These innovative trucks reflect DTNA’s commitment to bring practical, game-changing technology to market. The eCascadia, North America’s bestselling class-8 platform, and eM2 106 are built on validated, series-production platforms in extensive use by commercial vehicle customers every day. This gives us confidence that we will offer our customers the emission-free solutions they want for their fleets to meet real business needs. Our highest aim at Daimler Trucks is ensuring that we bring to market vehicles that are safe, reliable, and efficient.”

A Global Commitment to Commercial EV Fleets

At Daimler Trucks North America, we continue to pursue proprietary, integrated electrification solutions with an increasingly diverse lineup of commercial electric vehicles. Our next step is to learn more from our Freightliner Electric Innovation Fleet. These trucks are designed to meet customer needs for electrified commercial vehicles serving dedicated, predictable routes where the vast majority of daily runs fall between 45 and 150 miles.

These 30 vehicles will begin real-world testing in customer hands later this year. We are also committed to helping our customers overcome emerging EV challenges through the development of a charging-system standard for battery-powered commercial vehicles. DTNA is leading the CharIN taskforce with the objective of defining a new commercial vehicle, high-speed charging standard (>1MW) to maximize customer flexibility. In collaboration and consultation with utilities, service providers, charging system manufacturers and our fleet, we help create a win-win solution for new commercial EV infrastructure.

Current and Forthcoming EV Production

In addition to the exciting new Freightliner eCascadia and eM2 trucks, Daimler is leading the pack from North America with the Thomas Built Buses electric school bus. The C2 Saf-T-Liner or “Jouley” school bus from Thomas Built Buses was introduced last year in anticipation of limited production beginning in 2019.

Eighty Years of Innovative Engineering and Direct Customer Input

With decades of experience in successfully producing durable commercial vehicles in high volumes, our history of innovation empowers us with the knowledge and experience we need to continue to lead the industry, while reminding us to always prioritize the vital input of our customers who drive our trucks every day. We will continue to act on their ideas and pain points to both validate and improve our products as we move into an electrifying future.

Dr. Andreas Juretzka e-Mobility Group Lead

New Automation and Safety Innovations at Daimler Trucks North America

by Derek Rotz, Director of Advanced Engineering

Daimler Trucks North America (DTNA) has long been at the forefront of industry-leading innovations. Our legacy is defined by a track record of technological advancements, including Intelligent Powertrain Management – to save fuel on hilly terrain, Active Brake Assist – to apply full braking on stationary objects and Lane Departure Warning – to help drivers stay centered in their lanes. The quest to fulfill our mission to save fuel and lives drives our engineers to push the envelope every day.

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